Skip to main content

Hinduism


Published 2000
Topics usdoj.gov


Department of Justice
Office of Justice Programs
Bureau of Justice Assistance

Diversity Series: Religions, Cultures and Communities (NCJ 212664)

The Chicago Police Department

Disc 1: Religions (Disc 2: Cultures)

Part 7: Hinduism

There are 8 parts to this disc: 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8


Run time 9' 29"
Producer Chicago Police Department
Audio/Visual sound, color
Language English

Credits

Uploaded by Public.Resource.Org.

Reviews

Reviewer: IAMART - - August 4, 2010
Subject: Overstatated
I am a Hindu living in the United States in Texas. I arrived in the states as a young child when I was about five. I grew up in the states with one set of my parents born and raised in India, the other born and raised in Portuguese East Africa. My own Hindu upbringing is unique as it does not fit the typical Hindu characteristic as described in this video. Also, people should note that there is no single authority on Hinduism and there are many sects and interpretations of those sects. I would have to agree that some of the subject matter here is overstated-

I am going to add to the list that Sapna created.

1) Most Indians living in the US would probably be comfortable shaking hands since this form of greeting became familiarized with British colonial rule. However, it is true that older Hindu women are generally very modest and may prefer to namaste or just smile, and greet you without contact.

2) Most Indians would be fine with accepting things from the right hand of a police officer. It's just 'prasad' or blessed sweets that are brought/distributed from a temple, that are given special consideration of being accepted from the left hand. Generalizing this to everything is excessive, in my opinion.)

(There are many members of another sects of Hinduism that would argue that if your thoughts and actions are pure, then there should not be any difference in what hand you are giving or receiving prasad regardless of what a priest instructs you, because I only take orders from God and not a priest. There are actually is a large community of Hindus in greater Houston that share this belief).

3) The priest remarks that a Western office cannot "touch the lady". I think this is a pretty strong remark as it insinuates that the officer, who's duty is to serve and protect, is some how corrupt or impure and only a member of that person's family or another Hindu perhaps, is worthy of being able to "touch the lady" The priests' opinion is perhaps an opinion that he only shares with himself because there is a large group of Hindus that do not believe this.

Another note on touching the deity. There are many Hindus and Hindu temples where their belief is quite the opposite. They believe that their God and themselves are intertwines in one. They believe that humans are shadows or children of their Gos. In these situations, a police officer or anyone else should first and foremost, ask permission, and second, not assume directly that this person or temple believes that the deity should not be touched.

About Hindu monks not being in contact with the opposite sect--a few years ago, it was a big scandal in many Hindu temples where more often priests (rather than the devotee) was involved in a sexual harassment or sexual molestation scandal). Some were released with out any evidence, while many others were prosecuted.

3A

Gender awareness and how to deal with the opposite gender is made to seem as the common practice all across Hinduism, according to this video. However, this is not true in all sects. It depends on your upbringing and what particular sect your family or immediate communities of Hindu's follow. My own particular Hindu belief is that if the Supreme Being has made everyone, then everyone should be treated with the same respect and not told that they can not be contact by a priest or an officer because of their gender. Some sects even partition where the shoes are kept. For example, some sects will segregate male and female shoes.

This videos that the Chicago police has made, leaves out very important considerations. There is much statistical evidence from re-known sociologists, along with millions of testimony that suggest that female Hindu's are not treated with the respect and dignity that men are given. For example, if a Hindu woman is in her menstrual cycle, she will be banned from worship. If she allowed worship, she will be allowed to be in the back, away from the ceremony, others, or pictures, statues of deities.

More thoughts on purity. Many Hindus take showers in the evening, which is a tradition that is not widespread in India. Some Hindus are banned from temples because they do not take showers in the morning. Again, many Hindus believe that if your thoughts and your actions are pure, then it does not make a difference when you can worship.

4) Not all Hindus are vegetarian nor all non Hindus non smokers. It might be a close call or split as to how many Hindus are vegetarian versus meat eaters. They keep shrines in their homes, attend temple and live their lives with their own understanding of the religion and choose to eat what they wish. However, most Hindus will not eat cow or beef products as the cow is a sacred entity with most Hindus. Also, those Hindus that claim to be vegetarian will eat eggs and consume dairy products.


Reviewer: jayshil mehta - - June 1, 2010
Subject: swastik sysmbol
i am hindu european citizen,i really apreciate effort of chicago police to create awareness.when police is dealing wth hindus,it may happen sometime,now a days in usa,i think people are use to wth us culture.now regarding swastik symbol,hindu swastik is symbol of welcome of east tatva(positive energy)& always wth round circle inbetween,round circle is symbols of simplicity(purnta ka swaroop aur swikar),every humankinds,animals,birds,insects are perfect in their own world.so hindu relegeon doesnt belive in supramacy nor in racism.hindu swastik is always clockwise,it means it always goes wth time.when yu see swastik of nazi its almost everything is reverse.so make it clear its not same.
garv se kaho hum hindu hey.
mera bharat mahan.
jayshil mehta
Reviewer: Sapna - - July 3, 2008
Subject: Slightly overstated
This video was an excellent attempt at creating understanding of the Hindu faith, and Indian cultural norms.

However, a bit of constructive criticism in case this video is updated:
1) Most Indians living in the US would probably be comfortable shaking hands since this form of greeting became familiarized with British colonial rule. However, it is true that older Hindu women are generally very modest and may prefer to namaste or just smile, and greet you without contact.
2) Most Indians would be fine with accepting things from the right hand of a police officer. It's just 'prasad' or blessed sweets that are brought/distributed from a temple, that are given special consideration of being accepted from the left hand. Generalizing this to everything is excessive, in my opinion.
Reviewer: M.K.Subramanian - - July 3, 2008
Subject: God Bless CPD
A very great initiative indeed. Congratulations to all concerned. Its nice to know that CPD is doing its little bit to foster greater understanding amongst different religious communities. Please keep up the good work.
Wish this could be replicated all over the world.
I am a Senior Citizen living in Chennai, South India.
God Bless CPD.
Reviewer: srrs - - June 29, 2008
Subject: Hinduism
I admire the effort of Chicago Police to portray & familiarise the essentials of every religion & I appreciate this spirit of tolerance particularly at these times of religious fanaticism. That American Police is so much citizen-friendly is amply evident in this education.
Reviewer: chicagohindu - - June 10, 2008
Subject: Very Impressive
I am a resident of Chicago and once again I am incredibly impressed by the professionalism of the Chicago PD. I am Hindu and I have to write that this video done by the CPD is outstanding, informative, concise, and very objective. Everything mentioned in this clip is useful information for any law enforcement officer. Great job!
Reviewer: Rambabu48 - - May 3, 2008
Subject: Year of Swami Vivekananda's visit.
This is an excellent presentation on Hinduism. However, I noted a minor error. Swami Vivekananda brought Hinduism to the world at Chicago in 1893, not 1883. It was actually on Sept 11, 1893. Isn't ironic that the famous 9/11 of 1893 brought a message of "Help and not fight," "Assimilation and not Destruction," "Harmony and Peace and not Dissension," whereas the infamous 9/11 of 2001 brought the message of intolerance and violence?
Reviewer: snemana - - April 12, 2008
Subject: Thanks to Chicago Police for understanding and support to Hinduism
I am pleasantly surprised by this Video presentation by the Chicago Police and glad to hear their support and the depth of understanding in our great ancient and peaceful Hinduism.

Needless to say that being citizens of USA, we are still preserving and practiing our religion with the kind support, generosity and mutual respect provided by this country USA here now.

We look forward for more generations to be brought up here, spread our peaceful religion and practice Hinduism in this country forever.

Sa-r-ve-ja-naa-m Su-khi-no-bha-va-ntu!
Meaning: Let everyone be happy forever.

-Satya
Reviewer: ARoy - - April 11, 2008
Subject: Great job!
Great job by Chicago Police! Thanks for the effort in understanding and showing respect to different communities. I am proud to be a Hindu living in Chicago!
Reviewer: S.V.Rao - - April 10, 2008
Subject: Pleasant surprise
Chicago police are pleasently surprising!
Reviewer: Jayadev - - April 7, 2008
Subject: Swastika
The Video is good. As a Hindu living in Bangalore, a major city in South India, I laud the efforts of the Chicago Police Department to educate their officers as well as lay Americans.

One observation: If you look closely the Nazi Swastika is left handed while Hindu Swastika is right handed depending upon how you view it. This aspect seems to be little known. Hence these Swastikas are indeed different.
Uploaded by
malamud
on 10/3/2007
Views
48,103
Favorites
4
Reviews
11
PEOPLE ALSO FOUND
FedFlix
by National Archives and Records Administration
726
0
0
FedFlix
by National Archives and Records Administration
234
0
0
FedFlix
by National Archives and Records Administration
665
0
1
( 1 reviews )
FedFlix
by National Archives and Records Administration
485
0
0
FedFlix
by National Archives and Records Administration
354
1
0
FedFlix
by National Archives and Records Administration
207
1
0
FedFlix
by New Mexico State University
11
0
0
FedFlix
by New Mexico State University
38
0
0
FedFlix
by Government Printing Office
46
0
0
FedFlix
by Federal Judicial Center
30
0
0